Mja phimosis: This link used to work….

https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2003/178/4/treating-phimosis

The link above used to be a valid link. It showed a picture of a normal intact infant penis and an abnormal intact infant penis with true phimosis.
Basically, they showed slightly pulling back… Normally a non-retractable I can’t foreskin when pulled back slightly will pucker like lips and have a healthy pink look.
For true phimosis, when the foreskin is slightly pulled back the lips of the foreskin flatten out and look strained and white-ish and does not pucker like puckered lips.

(these are my own words above as the link above is now only for member use and I am not a member. I am only writing what I remember. I am not a dr or a scientist just someone who has been reading for 5 yrs on the intact boy because I am a mother.)

I found a link that works. It’s for a site in Canada
http://www.cfp.ca/content/53/3/445.full

——-
phony phimosis diagnosis: http://www.drmomma.org/2010/01/phony-phimosis-diagnosis.html?m=1

——
http://www.isrn.com/journals/urology/2012/707329/

“Phimosis is nonretraction of prepuce. It is normally seen in younger children due to adhesions between prepuce and glans penis. It is termed pathologic when nonretractability is associated with local or urinary complaints attributed to the phimotic prepuce. Physicians still have the trouble to distinguish between these two types of phimosis. This ignorance leads to undue parental anxiety and wrong referrals to urologists. Circumcision was the mainstay of treatment for pathologic phimosis. With advent of newer effective and safe medical and conservative surgical techniques, circumcision is gradually getting outmoded. Parents and doctors should a be made aware of the noninvasive options for pathologic phimosis for better outcomes with minimal or no side-effects. Also differentiating features between physiologic and pathologic phimosis should be part of medical curriculum to minimise erroneous referrals for surgery.”

……..

“11.2. Conventional Male Circumcision

In this case, the phimotic foreskin is totally excised. Circumcision is one of the oldest elective operations known in humans. It started as a religious/ritual sacrifice [90]. But gradually it became a routine neonatal procedure in USA and in some countries of Euro pein view of its reported hygiene and cancer-preventing benefits [91]. It cures phimosis and prevents recurrence [92]. It also prevents further episodes of balanoposthitis and lowers incidence of urinary tract infections [26, 93–95]. But it is besot with its own innumerable short, and long-term problems. Pain, difficult recovery, bleeding, infection, psychological trauma, and high cost are seen with circumcision [96, 97]. The literature is full of reports of morbidity and even deaths with circumcision. Besides, circumcision could lead to keloid formation. Possibility of decline in sexual pleasure for both circumcised males as well as their female partners due to loss of erogenous tissue has been reported [96, 98–105]. With advent of newer plastic surgical procedures for phimosis, this traditional surgery is gradually getting outdated. Circumcision is to be avoided in children with genital anomalies where the foreskin may be needed for later corrective surgery for the anomaly.”

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