Docking and circumcision

Why do we are have a fascination with cutting parts off of creatures?
This link: http://www.4rottweilers.com/rottweiler_natural_tail_truth.htm is against the tail docking of Rottweilers. (Awesome) in its arguments it actually makes a good case against circumcision or rather for leaving things as nature intended.
Excerpt:

We successfully finished one of the first tailed dogs in Canada – where they allow both docked and tailed dogs in the show ring (CanCh USRC NYS’04 SWRYS’03&’04 NCRSA’04 SWRSA’05 Redwood Krest’s Friday CS BH). Now there are MANY finished Canadian Champions! Both AKC and CKC judges have put up quality dogs, Friday received a 5 point major in Canada under a well known, highly regarded AKC judge. When I approached him after the show and told him “Thank you for finding my dog with the tail.” he simply replied “What’s not to find, he is a beautiful, correct Rottweiler and the tail doesn’t make a bit of difference.” Hmmm, Apparently the judges are still able to assess a dog’s structure with a natural tail.

…tail selection will suddenly move from no consideration at all to major consideration in the selection of breeding stock”

We have had many litters with natural tails and have found no need to change our breeding program to accommodate some imaginary problem with the tails or structure. Despite the fact that they were previously removed, the tails still knew what they were supposed to be if left intact. Ring tails and kinked tails do occur – in some bloodlines more than others – however they have no impact on the health of the dog, they are a simple cosmetic fault.

“…a long tail would probably become injured by beating it against the wall, the table, etc.”

A Rottweiler is no more prone to tail injuries than any other natural tailed dog. Would it be logical to argue that all dogs breeds should be docked to protect against tail injury? Tail sprains and injuries happen to all natural tail breeds but this has never been used as a reasonable argument to support docking of all dog breeds.

Docked or natural in the U.S. is purely personal preference. The presence of a tail has not, and will not change the structure of the breed, it is the breeders that change the structure of the breed. In the United States of America, ALL Rottweiler fanciers should striving for the same thing…

THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE!

—-

And a separate link:
http://www.wesburgs.com/Natural-World-Standard.htm
Excerpt:

Tail docking today is the amputation of a dog’s tail at varying lengths to suit the recommendations of a breed standard. Docking involves the amputation of the puppy’s tail either with scissors, a knife or with a rubber band (called banding). The cut goes through many highly sensitive nerves in the tissues including skin, cartilage, and bone. This procedure is usually performed without any anesthetic at between three to five days of age. The procedure can be performed by either a registered veterinary surgeon or by an experienced dog breeder. In many countries veterinarians are declining to perform this unnecessary procedure, meaning that breeders are now docking more dogs.

…..

Yes, there is strong evidence that this is the case. The puppy has a fully developed nervous system and a well-developed sense of pain. Puppies scream during the procedure and they whimper, whine and cry for 2-3 days following docking. During the recovery stage they do not eat well and tend to gain weight at a slower rate than undocked puppies. Many veterinarians condemn the practice and refuse to perform the procedure because it is totally unnecessary and can lead to serious complications. Some veterinarians continue perform tail amputation reluctantly in order to keep the procedure under professional supervision, please their clients and to minimize the risk to the pups.

…..

There is considerable scientific evidence that docking can lead to complications, including hemorrhage, infection and occasionally death of the puppy. In later life the stump of the tail may be painful due to the formation of neuroma (nerve tissue scar) in the stump. This also occurs following amputation of limbs in people and causes considerable discomfort. Dogs have evolved into their current shape over many thousands of years. If a tail were not useful to a dog, natural selection would have eliminated it long ago. Indeed, tails have many useful functions and are important for balance and body language among other things.

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